Leg

The upper leg begins at the hip and continues to the knee. The largest bone in the body and only bone in the upper leg is the femur. The femur’s head creates the ball and socket hip joint and the base of the femur connects to the knee. The major muscles in the upper leg are the hamstrings at the back of the thigh and the quadriceps in front of the thigh.

The lower leg has two bones, the tibia, which meets the femur at the knee, and the fibula. The tibia supports most of the body weight and is an important part of both the knee and ankle joints. The lower leg contains many muscles to help raise the leg and to facilitate foot movements. The Achilles tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel bone and used when walking, running and jumping.

LEG

Femur shaft fractures (broken thighbone) is a break anywhere along the length of the femur, the longest and strongest bone in the body. The long, straight part of the femur is called the femoral shaft. Because the femur is so strong, only extreme force can break the bone. Car accidents are the number one cause of femur fractures. A proximal tibia fracture is a fracture (break) in the tibia (shinbone) just below the knee. The proximal tibia is the upper portion of the tibia bone where it widens to help form the knee joint. A tibial shaft fracture occurs along the length of the bone, below the knee and above the ankle. Because it typically takes a major force to break a long bone, other injuries often occur with these types of fractures. In addition to the broken bone, soft tissues (skin, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and ligaments) may be injured at the time of the leg fracture. Both the broken bone and any soft-tissue injuries must be treated together. In many cases, surgery is required to restore strength, motion, and stability to the leg, and reduce the risk for arthritis.

Symptoms

  • Immediate, severe pain
  • Inability to walk or bear weight on affected leg
  • Pale, cool foot
  • Deformity or instability of the leg
  • Numbness around the foot

Diagnostic procedures

If symptoms suggest an upper or lower leg fracture, seek qualified orthopedic medical treatment.  Treatment will encompass a thorough examination, which could include diagnostic procedure(s) such as palpation, nerve and blood supply assessment, sensitivity and muscle strength analysis, X-rays, an MRI, and a CT scan in order to determine proper non-operative or operative treatment.
The hamstring muscles run down the back of the thigh beginning at the bottom of the pelvis, crossing the knee joint and ending at the lower leg.  Hamstring muscles help to extend the leg straight back and bend the knee.  A pulled hamstring or strain is an injury to one or more of the muscles at the back of the thigh. Hamstring muscle injuries occur frequently in athletes, especially athletes who participate in sports that require sprinting such as track, soccer and basketball.

Symptoms

  • Sudden, sharp pain in the back of the thigh causing a quick halt to activity
  • Swelling during the first few hours after injury
  • Bruising or discoloration of the back of the leg
  • Weakness in the hamstring

Diagnostic procedures

If symptoms suggest a hamstring injury, seek qualified orthopedic medical treatment.  Treatment will encompass a thorough examination, which could include diagnostic procedure(s) such as palpation, X-rays and an MRI in order to determine proper non-operative or operative treatment.
The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscles to the heel bone and is used when walking, running and jumping.Although the Achilles tendon can withstand great stresses, it is vulnerable to injury. A rupture of the tendon is a tearing and separation of the tendon fibers so that the tendon can no longer perform its normal function. The Achilles tendon is prone to tendonitis, a condition associated with overuse and degeneration, which causes pain and swelling along the back of the leg near the heel.

Symptoms

  • Pain and stiffness along the Achilles tendon
  • Pain along the tendon or back of the heel that worsens with activity
  • Severe pain the day after exercising
  • Thickening of the tendon
  • Chronic swelling that worsens with activity
  • Sudden “pop” in the back of calf or heel may indicate ruptured (torn) Achilles tendon

Diagnostic procedures

If symptoms suggest an Achilles tendon injury or tendonitis, seek qualified orthopedic medical treatment.  Treatment will encompass a thorough examination, which could include diagnostic procedure(s) such as X-rays and an MRI in order to determine proper non-operative or operative treatment.

Leg Treatment Testimonials

leg pain treatmentThirty years ago, I broke the tibia, fibula and ankle of both my legs one year apart. Now 30 years later, I suffered a stress fracture and my leg was put into a cast again. After 30 days, the leg was re-casted in a walking cast at a well-known doctor's office.

The second cast was much too tight, causing great pain and sleeplessness. The ghastly cast needed to be cut off on a Saturday. I contacted Baylor and Presbyterian Hospitals, but they were not equipped to cut off the cast. I called my doctor's office and spoke with the very nice PA on call, but he was unable to cut off the cast. I tried to contact multiple orthopedic offices, but they were all closed on Saturday. In desperation, I Googled for help and found DOC, a gift from heaven.

I called the DOC number and spoke to a charming young man, Andrew Duran, RT, who told me to come in and they would help me. When I arrived, I found a spotlessly clean office and another gracious employee, Samantha Sandos, RT. After completing the paperwork, I was led to a guest treatment room where I met one of the finest medical professionals, Blake Lyman, PA-C. I worked at a local hospital for 35 years where I met many great medical personnel. Blake ranks up there with the best of them.

I thought you would like to know how well your business operates and congratulate you for your clever entrepreneurial concept. You are filling a desperately needed niche! Now helpless patients like me have a new resource on weekends or evenings for quality orthopedic care.

LL

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